applebutterbomb:

avaruuskala:

In 10 years, I hope we can still be drinking tea together like we are now

This is so lovely it should be framed

swindledagain:

honpun:

drxgonfly:

Cute Bird (by Sijanto)

wow i dont even know where to begin

leg?
why leg???

swindledagain:

honpun:

drxgonfly:

Cute Bird (by Sijanto)

wow i dont even know where to begin

leg?

why leg???

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Fast-food workers protest in Cicero today, just west of Chicago. Part 1.

kgschmidt:

Our friend Ian recently bought an enormous foam sword, because of course he did. Rah showed her approval by finishing her afternoon nap with it. …because of course she did.

Yup, that’s me.  I look weird without my glasses and I need a haircut.

isawatree:

Light Beam by Wolfgang Moritzer

jumpingjacktrash:

roachpatrol:

jumpingjacktrash:

roachpatrol:

souridealist:

roachpatrol:

tbh i find solarpunk kind of naive and self-congratulatory but at the same time it’s tremendously hopeful and also i’m super weak to art noveau aesthetic, so why not! i’m really interested in if this is going to go anywhere or just be one more quick little n-punk fad. 

this reminds me of the thing I’ve been wondering about for a while: the thing about solarpunk is that it doesn’t seem to be very, well, punk. Now I am the furthest thing from an expert on this, I am just bouncing shit around, but I always thought that cyberpunk/steampunk/whateverpunk required a certain amount of bitterness about the society you were in, a certain amount of scraping by on the scraps and the edges. Illicit scraps of power. Hackers teasing bits of truth from the terrifying datanets of the world. Urchins in waistcoats picking pockets and fleeing through the tunnels under the roaring steam-engines. Wrestling what you can from a world that other people have used up, a world that doesn’t want you. 

And a huge part of solarpunk, or solar’punk’ - and I think a big part of why people are picking it up - is that none of that is there. It’s a world in renewal, a world expanding its bounty out towards the edges, a world where you can sidle in and sit under the vines and breathe, no matter what you’re looking for. And, don’t get me wrong, that is refreshing as shit. Recent dystopian trends have left me hungry for hopeful futures, and apparently I’m not the only one. But it makes me question the punk part. It’s more solarworld, solarfuture, but those aren’t recognizable Things, and it’s easier to convey an idea when you tie it to a Thing.

Like I said, I’m no expert, but I’ve been thinking about how I’d go about adding the punk-ish element back in (and, really, as I said, I like the extant solarpunk; this is about an alternate version in line with the name, not about “”“fixing”“” anything). I’m imagining little treasured hoards of plants on windowsills and fire escapes, people punching holes in tin cans and carrying them around for days to fill them up with little scrapes of fertile dirt, and balancing them on take-out trays for planters. Hiding them from landlords who don’t want plants in their buildings, bringing in bugs - growing them anyway, damn the landlords. Kids spraypainting graffiti made up of swirls and arches and bright soft greens, because all the walls have thirty years of neon spikes on them already. Women and girls who don’t like the way their curvy-chubby bodies look in pinching skintight jeans and high-tech jumpsuits that make it hard to breathe, so they say “screw it” and and sew together loose floaty drape-y things that look kind of strange at first, while they’re still figuring this out, but they don’t crush your stomach into your gut and you can move easily up and down the stairs when the elevator is broken and in the boiling humid heat of summer you can feel the breeze flow by you and swirl up your skirt. Someone reads a magazine article about outrageously rich people throwing “vitamin banquet” dinner parties, and how to throw a similar party on the affordable and reasonable budget of twice what she pays in rent each month, and when she mentions it to her landlord in the hall on Tuesday the landlord jokes about opening up the roof for a Vitamin D party, since that’s free, and then somehow the idea takes off and everyone on the block has rooftop sunshine potlucks on Saturday or Sunday afternoons, or sometimes Mondays or Wednesdays so the people who work the weekend shifts can make it. Everyone’s favorite science project is “make a solar-powered charger” so you can get your teacher to help you build something that’ll charge your phone or your game or whatever; some teachers catch on and make that a science unit, argue with the budget committees and shell out from their own pocket to buy the materials so the kids can do that, hope to God that this’ll convince at least a few of the kids that school is sometimes useful. Some clever entrepreneur selling sunshine tea by the sidewalk in a slow cart, carefully dodging various restrictions because there’s no actual electronic heating involved, just a few big jars and the daylight. People sneaking a little rebirth in around the edges of the world, instead of fighting for the table scraps. Maybe this is what your grandma, your great-grandmother, remembers, if you live in an original-flavor solarpunk future. Maybe this is how that got to be that way.

Oh, thank you, this is lovely.

yes, well said. i like this.

what came to my mind when thinking about putting some punk in solarpunk was a post-steampunk era where guerilla gardening and seedbombing is transforming brick rubble and rusty machinery to masses of vines, and mudlarks are living in reed huts downstream of the big cities where marshes purify the water, picking treasure out of the trash that washes up on their shores.

I was just commenting to Aud that it’s funny no one’s linked Solarpunk up with guerrilla gardeners and moss graffitti and stuff. Urban gardening, seedbombing, food trucks, backyard chicken coops, farmers’ markets and pop-up markets, even diy crafts— I definitely agree with you guys, I want to see more about the construction of this lovely dream than the peaceful utopia of living in it. 

And like…. up top the face of the green movement is all beautiful people with their hybrid cars and their organic fair trade coffee and their conspicuous consumerism, but I think under that is a lot of really dispossessed, disenfranchised people just waiting to blow the top off this toxic and unsustainable system that gives some people private jets and personal islands and the rest of us cancer and food deserts. 

I mean we live in a world where there’s more empty houses than homeless people, and american land was coopted from the indiginous peoples on the excuse that they weren’t working the land but now people get arrested for farming a dirt lot if a corporation is holding on to it for tax purposes. Shit’s fucked. I’d love to see some revolution. 

the thing i love about guerilla gardening is that it’s the opposite of violent, but it’s still not asking for permission from a system that’s broken. you just… up and do it. it’s so very human.

leseanthomas:

Many of these rates (before taxes, might I add) haven’t changed in 20 years. $100-$250 in 1994 aint the same as in 2014. This is why Comic Book Conventions for many comic illustrators, in many cases, are the lifeblood of their comic making (commissions, direct fan interaction books sales). 

Support your local mainstream or indie comic artist!!!!

Source: http://www.ehow.com/info_8068093_much-artist-make-per-project.html

roachpatrol:

ok but you know what’s hilariously apt and relevant about art nouveau getting a revival and being part of solarpunk? it was supposed to be this lifestyle art movement where every part of your house and all your stuff and even your clothes and accessories would reflect your sort of politico-aesthetic adherance to this philosophy of harmony between man and nature, and so rich men, men that made their wealth off the exploitation of men and nature, would live in these big beautiful houses, and commission these beautiful desks, and design these wonderful gardens, and stroll around enjoying every beautiful thing they could buy, and meanwhile the men and women bound up in the crushing labor of an industrial society could never have these beautiful things. they had no time to appreciate the forms of nature, or to have an aesthetic, they were too busy farming and machining and carving and weaving and building other people’s houses just to stay alive. 

like, man. the brutal classist hypocrisy of conscientious consumption was carved into the bones of this movement a hundred fucking years ago. how raw is that. 

socialjusticekoolaid:

Today in Solidarity: Protesters gather in Oakland against the Urban Shield conference and police militarization

Ever wonder where cities get all their fancy ideas on how to militarize their police force? It’s not just from the Pentagon— it’s conferences like Urban Shield, that highlight the latest in tactical equipment and practices for suppressing the very people you’re sworn to serve. #staywoke #whodoyouprotect #whodoyouserve 

nevver:

Dreams Ark, Ruilin Wang